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"This is your life, joys and sorrow mingled, one succeeding the other." - Ven Catherine McAuley, Foundress of the Mercy charism.

skooth:

this is important and more people need to understand this

(via le-swing-cajun)

— 2 hours ago with 126895 notes
#yes THIS!  #Norma may well be my spirit animal. 
"

I also wanted to point out that there are quite a few Bible verses that condemn men who have made sexual advances against women who were “questionably” dressed, as you might put it. Judah and his daughter-in-law, Tamar, for example. You may remember that Tamar dressed as a prostitute in order to entice Judah, because Judah refused to give her his third son in marriage, as was her right in that day and age. When she was later found pregnant, Judah is ultimately the one accused of wrongdoing (and rightfully so!). How about David and Bathsheba? He saw her bathing on the roof of her house (a perfectly normal custom in those days) and desired her. Who is punished later for the crimes that followed? Technically it was David’s son, true, but the text is clear that the punishment is meant for David; David was the one who committed the wrong. Shall we have another one? Jesus says absolutely nothing about women dressing provocatively, but in Matthew 5 he tells men that if they lust after another woman they have committed adultery, and later insinuates that they should probably just tear out their eyes. That’s right – Jesus’ solution to the lust problem is that men should tear out their eyes if they can’t help themselves, not that women should cover up more.

Revealing one’s body to others was not an unusual thing in the ancient world. They had public baths and public latrines, neither of which were separated according to gender or afforded much privacy. If you got worked up over seeing someone naked, that was your problem, not theirs. I really don’t see why it should be so different today.

"

Comment by Chris Rinker on When Suits Become a Stumbling Block 

This is my favorite comment on anything ever.

(via liftedeyes)

(via notalwaysluminous)

— 5 hours ago with 1346 notes

dickrockerjanecrocker:

likesboyswholikeboys:

you can preach about slut-shaming all you want, but you can’t deny there’s something very wrong with 13 and 14-year old girls going out in skirts and dresses so short they barely cover their asses and shirts with necklines so low they show off cleave they haven’t got yet, drinking and even smoking and hooking up with guys before they even have a substantial knowledge of how sex and sexual relationships work.

Thank YOU HOLY SHIT


Yes. You’re quite right. There is something hugely, massively, giganticly f*cking wrong with the fact that society teaches young girls from a prepubescent age that the way they can be most appreciated is if they go out in short skirts and get raped, in the statutory (and often in the commonplace) sense of the word. And you, OP, commenting and promoting the fact that it’s wrong, making out that it’s actually the girl’s conscious decision and therefore that we’re preaching about slut shaming when we should be preaching about girls being purposefully dirty drunken whores, are actually part of the f*cking problem. Start helping the people around you respect themselves, their bodies, their sexuality and their souls before you start suggesting that slut shaming is ok because underage girls are clearly asking for it, as if they know what “it” is actually all about.

Slut shaming, and young teens (particularly girls) being taught that the only way non family members will love them is if they make themselves available for everything up to and including sex (whilst inebriated) are two different problems, folks. And both would be dealt with if we all just had a little bit more respect for each other, and ourselves, and inspired those around us to do the same.

(Source: anderson-hastings, via loubelle04)

— 15 hours ago with 436692 notes
#Danielle gets angry  #I am a feminist 
canonizedandotherwise:

Christ Raises the Daughter of Jairus written by Yelena Cherkasova

canonizedandotherwise:

Christ Raises the Daughter of Jairus written by Yelena Cherkasova

(via faithinseeds)

— 18 hours ago with 29 notes
#Jairus' Daughter  #Talitha Koum  #Christian  #Gospel  #Catholic  #Orthodox 

So… There is a beautiful deep forest green wool/felt skirt + waistcoat set on sale in one of the local shops. It’s a whopping €59, but I still have about €90 of my birthday money…

The only thing is… It will make me look SO like a Sister in a modified habit. Like, much more than normal.

Thoughts?

— 20 hours ago with 2 notes
#notanun stories 
"

As lesbians and gay men have come out of the closet, it becomes clear that there are far more of us in religious vocations than our percentage of the total population would lead one to expect. What brings us into such roles, often within religious institutions that are officially intolerant toward us even while they accept our contributions to their life?… It is not our strength but our marginalization in modern Western culture that compels us to pay attention to the deeper aspects of our human experience… we find ourselves living with a basic contradiction in everyday life, knowing that Reality has shaped us in ways that the mainstream of our culture not only rejects, but even at times punishes. We have to ask questions that others do not have to ask….

The person who takes up the priestly ministry in a conscious way is saying that the first order of business is neither to salve one’s wounds nor to change the outer world, but to experience what is and to understand how one’s experience of it is experience of the Holy. By leading our lives, the lives we have been dealt by circumstance, on the boundary with the Hidden, we grow in understanding—an understanding which we can then share with others at the boundary.

"

L. William Countryman, Living on the Border of the Holy. (via voraciousexpectations)

I love this. It resonates with this theory I have, too, about why there is such a significantly higher than expected number of queer women in religious life (though no one can talk about it lol lol lol). 

It’s not just that a bunch of gay ladies were like, well, if I can’t come out, I guess I’ll be a nun. 

I have this theory (unsubstantiated, but…actually it’s a little anecdotally substantiated) that queer women grow into ourselves in such a way that demands we imagine, in whatever form, alternative ways of living into adulthood that don’t follow the culturally sanctioned “marry dude and have children” narrative. At whatever age we realize that this will, more than likely, not be what we do, we’re forced to confront this radical absence of prescriptives. We have to find and create and protect our own languages and images of our current and future selves. We’re always reframing and planting new seeds on paths we were never even told to look for that point toward places we’ve never been taught to name or understand.

Even when I was a dorky little queer kid, I knew I wouldn’t marry a man and have kids. I wasn’t repulsed by the idea. It was more like, cool, but no thanks. When I finally figured myself out a bit, I wasn’t even upset. Just relieved that there were a few words (if ill-fitting and occasionally horrible) that could anchor a small part of my emotionally unmoored adolescence. 

So when I started thinking about religious life (note my strategic avoidance of the word “call” - although it was pretty clear), I was already used to imagining myself outside of typical configurations of adult living. It wasn’t even an issue to think of foregoing marriage and children (which I understand a lot of women considering religious life deeply struggle with). It was easier to slip into visions of a very countercultural framework for a future, because, quite simply, I’d already been doing it for my entire life. 

I think perhaps because queer women have elements of this fluidity, creativity, and - you know, I’ll say it - courage, more of us are likely to seriously think about becoming religious. We realize how much can be at stake when considering questions of identity and authenticity, and we have often already made such devastating sacrifices, be they in our own souls or in our relationships with others. We know what we’re ready to throw down for the real deal, and if the real deal is God, well, it turns out we’re unstoppable. 

(via fiatluxetfactaestlux)

(via fiatluxetfactaestlux)

— 20 hours ago with 62 notes
#So much yes  #Religious Life  #Vocation  #LGBTQ 
Sister Acts - The New York Times →

IN an age of villainy, war and inequality, it makes sense that we need superheroes. And after trying Superman, Batman and Spider-Man, we may have found the best superheroes yet: Nuns.

(Source: fiatluxetfactaestlux)

— 20 hours ago with 9 notes
#Love this  #Catholic Sisters  #Religious Sisters 

mdthwomp:

Unfriendly reminder that in America it’s reasonable to say an unarmed black kid deserved to be shot six times because he might have robbed a convenience store, but a white kid shouldn’t be kicked off the high school football team just because he violently raped a girl.

(via notalwaysluminous)

— 21 hours ago with 110865 notes
#painfully true 
scottxstephens:

On this week’s episode of “Richard Dawkins is a Total Piece of Shit” New Atheism’s Pat Robertson suggests that mothers pregnant with children with Down Syndrome should abort. 

What’s shocking to me about this whole thing (which is still ongoing on his Twitter account) is not his suggestion for a mother to abort a fetus, I expected that from him. I’m shocked by the logical conclusion of his line of thought, which is that society should take measures to decrease the population of individuals with Down Syndrome. 

His language caught me off guard also. He uses the word “immoral” to describe willingly bringing a child with Down Syndrome into the world. How does he rationalize a statement like that?



I’m not sure I can force my objections to Richard Dawkins to form an orderly queue to enable their expression…

scottxstephens:

On this week’s episode of “Richard Dawkins is a Total Piece of Shit” New Atheism’s Pat Robertson suggests that mothers pregnant with children with Down Syndrome should abort.

What’s shocking to me about this whole thing (which is still ongoing on his Twitter account) is not his suggestion for a mother to abort a fetus, I expected that from him. I’m shocked by the logical conclusion of his line of thought, which is that society should take measures to decrease the population of individuals with Down Syndrome.

His language caught me off guard also. He uses the word “immoral” to describe willingly bringing a child with Down Syndrome into the world. How does he rationalize a statement like that?


I’m not sure I can force my objections to Richard Dawkins to form an orderly queue to enable their expression…
— 1 day ago with 137 notes
#And today on Richard Dawkins is a knobhead...  #Urghhh  #Downs Syndrome  #Abortion 
A prayer that gets me through the night

simply-walking:

This night and every night
seems infinite with questions,
and sleep as elusive as answers.

Pain and longing are always present,
dulled only a little
by the distractions of the day.
I am weary. I am angry.
I am confused.

Circle me, Lord.
Keep despair and disillusion without.
Bring a glimmer of hope within.

Circle me, Lord
keep bitterness without.
Bring an occasional sense
of Your presence within.

from: Celtic Daily Prayer, pg. 227. 

— 1 day ago with 12 notes
#prayer  #night prayer  #Celtic 

by-grace-of-god:

These are photographs of a church named after a former prostitute. 

Amazing to think that a woman scorned by her peers in her time would have such a monument built in her memory.

But then again, it’s not such a surprise since the ‘dignity of women’ is fully recognized by the Catholic Church who regards women as a ‘spiritual beauty’, ‘a great treasure’ and declares that it owes much to the “genius of women”. (St. John Paul II)

Photos: Santa Maria Maddalena Church (1,2)


With respect to the original poster, it is untrue and misleading to say that this Church is named after a former prostitute.

More correctly, one can say that the Church - hierarchy and laity - at the time of building this Church, misguidedly believed the idea of the “composite” Mary, a penitent prostitute, primarily thanks to a homily made by Gregory the Great. But it has been firmly established by the Vatican when they changed the calender in 1969, that the “composite Mary” (ie, the Mary that is a conflated version of the Gospel Mary of Magdala, Mary of Bethany and St Mary of Egypt) is not accurate, and that the idea that Mary of Magdala was a repentant prostitute was an idea first promulgated in the 400s, highlighted by Pope Gregory in about 591, and which came to prominence during the medieval period because of a clerical wish to promote penitence. Artistically and creatively, the image has caught many eyes, right through medieval and renaissance periods, up to today, even after the Vatican specifically said that the “composite Mary” is not to be celebrated. At which point the Eastern Church presumably went “finally!” as they had never agreed with the composite idea, or with the concept of Mary as a penitent prostitute. In fact, they have always taught that Mary led a chaste and virtuous life even prior to her conversion.

Canonical texts put Mary as the woman Jesus cast seven demons out of; one of the women who followed Jesus during His ministry, taking care of His needs; one of the women who stayed by the Cross, and later saw where He was buried, and of course, as the Apostle to the Apostles, the woman who was first witness to the Resurrection, and who told (a reportedly unbelieving) Peter and the others (the men who reportedly scorned Mary…) In other words, a devoted and holy disciple who was ‘entrusted with divine truths’ (St JP2).

Propagating a myth like this does nothing to prove the Church’s belief in the Dignity of Women (etc) - quite the opposite in fact. Being accurate will illustrate that belief far more truthfully - and that is what the Church, and her women (Saints, saints and pilgrim people), deserve.

tl;dr - respectfully, accuracy in comments is helpful; inaccurate comments propagate a myth which denigrates the second most important woman in the Gospels. And the Vatican specifically spoke against the “composite Mary” in 1969.

(via sunbeam-onacloudyday)

— 1 day ago with 64 notes
#st Mary Magdalene  #Mary of Magdala  #Catholic  #Please be accurate